Communication and critical thinking skills

There is an interesting post on Forbes, which talks about the two key traits graduates need to exemplify to future employers. These are soft skills you’re supposed to pick up along the way during your degree:

  • Effective communications skills so that you can work with the people on your team and others and be able to provide clear and concise messages tailored to the audience you’re addressing, while also using suitable communication channels in the appropriate context.
  • Real world critical thinking skills based on experience so that you are effective in your time management and situational analysis and know how to develop suitable creative solutions, which can be followed through with appropriate action plans.

All of this can be picked up through summer placements, as well as other work during your degree as well as volunteering if that option is open to you too. This is not hard, but is often overlooked by students.

GSJ Aberdeen 2014

These skills are also ones that you pick up while ideating and developing a startup business. You need to critically evaluate creative solutions to problems faced by potential customers. You also need to communicate your ideas to different audiences using suitable communication channels. You also need to determine appropriate action plans based on your limited time and money and follow through on them so that you can start the next iteration of the idea as you keep moving forward, or pivoting your idea as you uncover new informtion.

 

The Scottish Design Summit 2014

The Scottish Design Summit last week In Dundee organised by Design in Action was less useful than I thought it would be. We had many stories during the day, and some short workshops too. However, it was mostly a chance for us to hear what others wanted to tell us about their experience and not enough space for us to meet new people and exchange our experiences with each other.

I like the idea of Design in Action and how it pulls together the Scottish design schools in order to help businesses through academic work and participation. It’s a good example of creative enterprise and showing how design can help business. It was odd though that we never heard from one of the businesses who’ve received help in one of the talks during the day. That would’ve been useful.

The biggest surprise was that for a ‘design summit’ and speakers repeatedly extolling the value of design in business we had the usual round of presentations that present ‘facts’ as uninspiring lists with no application of design to improve the message delivery. I had looked forward to seeing inspiring ‘designedly’ infographics and diagrams explaining the lessons learned by the different organisations presenting their stories of using design to improve their business. This did not happen. We saw powerpointy slides. But don’t just take my word for it, see what others talked about at #scotdesign14.

Scottish Design Summit

Only a handful offered designerly presentations. Stanley Wood from Spotify presented a smoothly integrated presentation with movies and stills seamlessly telling the Spotity story of integrating design into their app. Richard Hewitt from Taylor Haig offered stories around the slides he presented and Mark Hogart from Harris Tweed Hebrides mixed slides and movies together to support the story of their transformation. These were memorable presentations illustrating the power of stories and how images support the stories more importantly than lists of statements as bulletpoints.

And the workshops were too short. We barely got started working on an idea and it was time to move onto the next workshop. A better solution would’ve been to either offer us only one workshop, or to cut down the speakers so that we could still have two workshops. The later would’ve been better as workshops offer chances to talk to people and learn new skills while hearing what others are doing and telling your story too.

My biggest take-away from the day was that I can keep following my current practice of focusing on where I’m currently at, and don’t always need to keep looking for what others have to offer. I have experience and skills in this area gained from reading, going to other workshops, and through organising service design events, and practicing what I learned with students. I already deploy this knowledge and skills in what I teach my students and in workshops I run. There was nothing new there except for stories to illustrate examples; the Spotify, Taylor Haig and Harris Tweed stories. The workshops offered interesting ways to present things I already did, so that was reassuring.

I’m looking forward to seeing what happens in this space in the future, as it was a useful day and I did learn things, but less useful than I hoped it would be. Maybe I’ve been going to too many agile events where open space is provided for participants to air their ideas too, and missed that opportunity too. Maybe next time.

Needless to say, it is also very useful to reconnect with friends at these events, which was an extra surprise.

Come join us at The Meat Conference 31 May

We’re sponsoring The Meat Conference in Aberdeen on 31 May 2014. You’ll hear from a number of interesting speakers about the usefulness of your ‘side project’ as a designer and developer. We’ll be there to help explain to you how we can help you level up your skills with us so that your side project becomes your main project.

The Meat Conference

We want to help people realise their potential. We understand that launching a startup is not an easy step, and are here to help. We also know that all of the skills you need in founding a startup are also extremely useful in any career path and will enable you to become a valued intrapreneur within any large firm too. So if you’re at The Meat Conference, then look for us and have a chat about where you want to be this time next year.